News


Immune cells heal the intestine by controlling iron


An iron-regulating molecule called hepcidin is produced by the immune system and restricts the growth of gut bacteria after an intestinal injury, helping to heal the lining of the intestine, according to a study by Weill Cornell Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian and Institut Cochin investigators. The study, published April 10 in Science, was conducted in mice and human samples and could have important implications for treating gastrointestinal diseases that damage the lining of the intestines.

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Researchers seek universal treatments to impede coronavirus


New research from a team of Cornell collaborators points to a possible target for antiviral treatment for COVID-19. Their review paper, “Coronavirus Membrane Fusion Mechanism Offers a Potential Target for Antiviral Development,” published April 6 in Antiviral Research. The multidisciplinary group was led by Susan Daniel, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, and Gary Whittaker, professor of virology at the College of Veterinary Medicine.

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Cell-free biotech could drive COVID-19 therapeutics


A biomanufacturing company spun out of Cornell research is seeking to rapidly translate an antibody therapy against COVID-19 by using cell-free biotechnology based on glycoengineered bacteria. And it could scale up the production 10 times faster than conventional methods. The company, SwiftScale Biologics, was co-founded by Center member Matt DeLisa.

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Campus community donates essential medical supplies


As hospitals across the country try to manage a surge in coronavirus patients while also facing a global shortage in the protective gear needed to treat them, the Cornell community has banded together to donate crucial medical supplies to local health care providers.

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Research interrupted: Lab groups find their way together


Everyone is working together, pitching in to find solutions while suspending research and closing down laboratories. Find out what is going on and how researchers plan to be productive remotely.

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Awards honor exceptional microbiology and immunology research


The Department of Microbiology and Immunology in the College of Veterinary Medicine celebrated this year’s recipients of the Biocytogen Best Research Paper Awards on March 5. In a brief ceremony, department chair Dr. Ted Clark recognized fourth-year Ph.D. student Cybelle Tabilas for her first-place paper, as well as recent graduate Angela Yan, Ph.D. ’19, for the runner-up prize.

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Study: Infectious gut bacteria may predict UTI risk


Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in kidney transplant patients may be caused by bacteria that originate in the digestive tract, according to investigators at Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, and NewYork-Presbyterian.

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