News


Awards honor exceptional microbiology and immunology research


The Department of Microbiology and Immunology in the College of Veterinary Medicine celebrated this year’s recipients of the Biocytogen Best Research Paper Awards on March 5. In a brief ceremony, department chair Dr. Ted Clark recognized fourth-year Ph.D. student Cybelle Tabilas for her first-place paper, as well as recent graduate Angela Yan, Ph.D. ’19, for the runner-up prize.

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Study: Infectious gut bacteria may predict UTI risk


Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in kidney transplant patients may be caused by bacteria that originate in the digestive tract, according to investigators at Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, and NewYork-Presbyterian.

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New experimental system proves tuberculosis bacteria have friends and foes in vivo


Dr. David Russell, the William Kaplan Professor of Infection Biology in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology in the Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine, has used a cutting-edge method for illuminating the interaction between the bacteria that cause tuberculosis and two different kinds of host cells.

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Alumnus named inaugural Langer Professor in Meinig School


Shaoyi Jiang, Ph.D. ’93, a professor of chemical engineering at the University of Washington, has been named the first Robert S. Langer ’70 Family and Friends Professor at Cornell. Jiang will join the Nancy E. and Peter C. Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering in July, in a professorship honoring one of the university’s most notable engineering alumni.

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Mutant proteins linked to DNA damage, muscular dystrophy


Jan Lammerding is the senior author on new Cornell-led research paper which reports a strong connection between DNA damage triggered by mutations in proteins that surround the cell nucleus, known as lamins, and muscular dystrophy. By exploring the mechanisms that cause the damage, the researchers are hopeful their discovery can help shape better treatments. “Mutant Lamins Cause Nuclear Envelope Rupture and DNA Damage in Skeletal Muscle Cells,” was published Dec. 16 in Nature Materials.

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Simulating amino acid starvation may improve dengue vaccines


Researchers from the University of Hyderabad in India and the College of Veterinary Medicine have identified a compound that could be part of a strategy to improve the effectiveness of the dengue vaccine.

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Immunologist Dr. Carl Nathan Wins Sanofi – Institut Pasteur Award


Dr. Carl Nathan, chairman of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Weill Cornell Medicine, has been awarded the Sanofi – Institut Pasteur Senior International Scientist Award for Biomedical Research in Microbiology and Infection.

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